Peru Travel, Peru Tours Peru Hotels Peru Flights Peru Travel Guide by e-Peru Travel
 
Peru Typical Dresses
Peru Culture and Traditions

Cusco, Land of the Incas
Inca Trail to Machu Picchu
Puno and Lake Titicaca
Nazca Lines
Choquequirao Peru
Royal Tombs of Sipan
The Kuelap Fortress
Colca Canyon in Arequipa
Mountaineering in Peru
Manu National Park
Paracas National Reserve
Machu Picchu Cusco
Lima Peru

Destinations in Peru

Abancay
Arequipa
Ayacucho
Cajamarca
Colca Valley
Cusco
Chachapoyas
Chiclayo
Huancavelica
Huancayo
Huanuco
Huaraz
Ica
Iquitos
Lima
Machu Picchu
Manu
Moquegua
Moyobamba
Nazca
Ollantaytambo
Paracas
Pasco
Piura
Pucallpa
Puerto Maldonado
Puno
Sacred Valley
Tacna
Tarapoto
Trujillo
Tumbes
 


In Peru's rural areas, the way people dress makes an important distinction, as a result of the blend of pre-Hispanic influences with the European clothing that the natives were forced to wear during the colonial era.

The traditional Inca anacu was transformed by the local women into the brightly-colored and multi-layered petticoats known as polleras. Depending on the region, a black skirt is decorated with a belt which can come in a variety of colors and is decorated with flowers in the northern Piura highlands or a brightly-hued woolen lliclla in Chiclayo, further south.

In the highlands above Lima, the skirt is decorated with red and black embroidered edging, while in Junín, as in Cajamarca and Cusco, women no longer use black skirts. Underneath their skirts, the women use layers of petticoats made from cotton which can be embroidered with gold and silver threads, featuring superbly-crafted drawings along the edge.

The Peruvian poncho dates back to the seventeenth century and apparently is a variation on the unku used by men at the time. The heavy ponchos used in Cajamarca keep out the rain and are as long as those used in Puno, where they are died scarlet during festivals. In Cusco, ponchos are short and feature elaborate geometric figures against a red background.

On the coast, ponchos were used by the plantation workers, and they were spun from cotton or vicuña fiber. In the jungle, both men and women from some tribes wear the cushma, a loose tunic stitched up on both sides and embellished with dyes and geometric figures typical of the region.

Traditional dress tends to be capped off by woolen or straw hats, sometimes in various colors. But in the coldest reaches of the Andes, the highlanders tend to wear the chullo, a woolen cap fitted with earflap decorated with geometric motifs.

Regional dances require different forms of dress, depending on the area.  Along the coast, exponents of the marinera dance replaces cotton with silk for their embroidered skirts. In the Andes, meanwhile, the danzantes de tijeras or scissors dancers decorate their fine outfits with small mirrors and embroider an image of their guardian deity on their backs.


Traditional and Popular Folk Crafts and Arts in Peru

Carved Gourds
Decorative Utensils
Fleeting in Peru
Funeral Art
Images
Baskets and Other Straw Articles
Peruvian Jewelry
Leather Goods
Pottery in Peru
Sarhua Boards
Peruvian Textiles


Peruvian Musical Instruments - Typical Dances in Peru

The Cajon
The Charango
The Guitar
The Harp
The Mandolin
The Quena
The Quijada
The Tinya
The Zampoña
The Carnival
Peruvian Cumbia or Chicha
The Festejo
The Harawi
The Huaylarsh
The Huayno
The Marinera
The Santiago
Scissors Dancers
The Sikuri
Vals Criollo


Peru Pictures - Images and Photos of Peru




 

Peru Culture & Traditions
Folk Art in Peru
Peruvian Instruments
Peruvian Dances
Peruvian Gastronomy
Traditional Festivities
Traditional Dresses
Peru Tourist Calendar

About Peru

Peru Facts at a Glance
Destinations in Peru
Archaeological Sites
Historical Legacy
Nature and Ecology
Peru Culture & Traditions
Adventure Sports in Peru

Useful Peru Travel Info

Peru Festivities Calendar
Travelogues
Peru Weather
Embassies & Consulates
Airlines in Peru
Peru Pictures
Useful Tips

Contact Us
Peru Travel, Peru Tours Peru Hotels Peru Flights Peru Travel Guide by e-Peru Travel
 

www.perutravels.net ¦ www.perubudgettours.net ¦ www.peru-viajes.net
www.e-peru-travel.com